Improve your riding with InfoCrank’s power webinars

Improve your riding with InfoCrank’s power webinars

Want to know how to accelerate and attack or how to keep going for hours? Ever wondered how to structure your training so you get faster and find more enjoyment?

Over the coming months, we have a busy schedule of webinars aimed at helping riders to get the most out of their power meter and training.

The webinars are hosted by Verve Cycling CEO, Bryan Taylor – a true expert who has worked alongside the world’s best coaches and riders, including the GB Cycling Team and the UCI.

Demonstrating practical, easy-to-do steps and skills, the webinars aim to give you new-found knowledge that you can take away and slot into your everyday training routine.

To view the available times and register, please click the relevant links in the schedule below. Spaces on the webinars are limited. If you can’t make the session, please let us know as there is potential to add additional dates – just get in touch via improve@vervecycling.com.

Schedule

Thursday 22 April 2021: Five ways to go faster – the short game
➡️ Register for the event 
➡️ Find out more about the event 

Thursday 29 April 2021: Five ways to go faster – the long game
➡️ Register for the event 
➡️ Find out more about this session

Thursday 13 May 2021: Five ways to improve your training
➡️ Register for the event 

Thursday 27 May 2021: Five ways to make 2021 your best riding year
➡️ Register for the event 

Thursday 10 June 2021: Five things all coaches should know
➡️ Register for the event 

Why InfoCrank is the most accurate power meter in the world

Why InfoCrank is the most accurate power meter in the world

Power meters are available in a variety of forms and there’s a lot to think about when considering which one to invest in. There is, however, a key difference between the InfoCrank and all other power meters – here’s what you need to know.

What does a power meter measure?
So what does a power meter actually measure? Power is a product of torque x cadence:

  • Torque is a measure of how much force is acting on the pedal causing it to rotate, i.e. the tangential force per pedal stroke.
  • Cadence is the speed at which the pedal is rotating around.
  • Torque x cadence = power (watts).

Direct measurement vs algorithms
Torque can only be accurately measured from the cranks of the bike. Other positions – such as pedals, hubs and spiders – can measure some of the many forces that are applied to make the bike go, but the tangential force, which drives the bike forward, is applied only to the crank.

This fact is really important. It is the distinction between direct measurement (with the InfoCrank) and mathematical algorithmic calculations – the other power meters. The InfoCrank measures torque from within the crank arms at a rate of 256 times per second to provide a true, precise and completely comparable result, regardless of temperature, road surface, slope and all the other variables inherent in bike riding.

The other devices are measuring force somewhere on the bike and then using mathematic algorithms to deduce what they believe the power number to be. Therefore they can be very good at averages and overall output, however the problem is that improvement in anything does not come out of averages, but out of specifics.

Calibration for life or as often as possible?
Being built to measure the right force in the right place means that the InfoCrank power meter does not need constant calibration or zeroing. This happens at the factory and just as the crank maintains the same shape for life, the calibration is also for life.

Zeroing after battery changes is recommended, because a surge is introduced into the system. However, nothing more is necessary. Every other time you ride, you simply pair your InfoCrank with your head unit and ride.

This contrasts with all the other devices, which tell you to calibrate as often as possible – even when running late for that group ride! But when a measurement device itself needs on-going calibration, how can you trust it? When does it start to ‘go off’? At the end of the ride or closer to the beginning? You have no way of knowing. If you are like us, you don’t want to fiddle with equipment constantly to make it work. You want to get on your bike and ride.

So consider what you’re looking for in a power meter – do you want accuracy you can trust or an estimation based on algorithms? Do you want the simplicity of having a power meter that is already calibrated for life or do you want a power meter that requires constant calibration?

Get in touch if you’d like to talk to our experts about which InfoCrank is right for you.

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Five ways to go faster – the long game

Five ways to go faster – the long game

So, you still have a need for speed on your bike?

In the first part of this series looking at five ways to go faster, we looked at the ‘short game’ – something I cover in more depth in my most recent webinar

You have been working on aspects of your training and have now increased your speed on the take-off for the attack and the short hill climb and once you have attacked, you can sustain a high level of effort for several minutes.

Now we want to focus on the long game – how can you do all that we talked about but keep going for hours? It’s a golden question, but there is no solution to this that does not involve time.

Some people, particularly in these interesting and challenging times, have become very fast at short distance indoor events, but are going to be found somewhat wanting when they get back out on the roads again.

There are two problems about building up speed without building up endurance.

The first is maybe not intuitive. If you have a health or injury problem and you do not carry endurance fitness into it, you basically have to start again. You could have multiple setbacks when endurance fit and return back to your top very quickly even several times in a season, but not if you only have ‘speed fitness’.

The second problem is that the world is filled with riders who can ride fast for a short distance, but not make the distance of the event – for most of those you need endurance fitness.

Projects 2

What we will cover in part two of the Five Ways to go Faster webinar are some examples of how to do endurance training and riding, how to handle multi-day events, and also how back-to-back days of long riding make you stronger. The incredible irony of true endurance training is that when you do it slow, you actually get faster. We will explore that.

The last of our five tips will be focused on rest, which I will combine with testing. But in simple terms, proper rest is the pump that primes your improvement. Remember, most sub-elite riders do not improve. This session explains the two main reasons why that is a fact.

To join the Five Ways to go Faster – the Long Game webinar with Verve Cycling CEO, Bryan Taylor, on Thursday 29th April 2021, click here to view the available sessions and register.

The first webinar in this series – Five Ways to go Faster – the Short Game – will take place on Thursday 22nd April 2021. Click here to view the available sessions and sign-up. 

Five ways to go faster – the short game

Five ways to go faster – the short game

Over the coming weeks, Verve Cycling CEO, Bryan Taylor, will share five simple concepts that you can slot into your everyday training routine to help you go faster.

The first webinar will cover three of them in what Bryan calls the ‘short game’. That is the training you do so that you can accelerate, attack and sustain a three to 10 minute effort. The next webinar will look at the endurance aspect.

Even since our childhood days of first riding a bike, we’ve always wanted to go as fast as we can. It’s a simple cycling joy.

We all love cycling, but we don’t all like training even if we secretly want to go faster.

Here at Verve Cycling, we are in the business of measurement which means that our bias is often towards numbers and measures. However, this does not mean that it is all about the numbers that you can see on your bike computer. I had to be reminded about this by one of my mentors years ago.

He said: “Bryan, it is not all about watts, the aim is to go faster.”

Now I know this man was the coach and team owner of two Tour de France multiple champions and world champions, but even so, his words confronted me.

Eventually, I realised that he was right. Yes, you can ride and just enjoy the scenery, and I love doing that. But if you are training, then in the end the only thing you want to do, is go faster.

So, how can you achieve this? Over the coming weeks, I’d like to share with you five simple concepts that you can slot into your everyday training routine. I think they will pay great dividends for you and make you faster.

The first webinar will cover three of them in what I call the ‘short game’. That is the training you do so that you can accelerate, attack and sustain a three to 10 minute effort. The next webinar will look at the endurance aspect.

You may have heard coaches describe some of these approaches in the past – what I will try and do is reduce some of the important, but technical language and try to speak in simple, clear, understandable terms.

If you want to go faster for very short periods, like an acceleration from a slow speed or standing start, it requires significant immediate effort. Most sub-elite riders do not practice this skill and tell us that they cannot sprint. We contend that is not true – they have just not practiced the correct routines. In the webinar, we will discuss the way to do it – simple but hard.

Projects 3

Image: Michael Blann Photography

But if accelerations are simple but hard, then the attack and sustain is simple but harder still. Simple to understand and so hard to do that most sub-elite riders prefer to not practice it. But a little work here goes a really long way and once you get it under your skin, it is a bit addictive and enjoyable in itself. What I will tell you how to do will centre on 45 seconds to one minute efforts and we will see how that parlays out into performance even up to several minutes.

Those first two exercises involve technique and even more brute strength and powerful will. The next practice requirement is skill based – We will look at fast pedalling, both what it is and what I don’t think it is. We will also touch on super-fast pedalling

Integrate these things into your training programme and you will have plenty of time to enjoy the bike and the scenery even while your speed increases.

You can have your cake and eat it too!

The first webinar in this series, Five Ways to go Faster – the Short Game, will take place on Thursday 22 April 2021 with Verve Cycling CEO, Bryan Taylor. Click here to view the available sessions and register.

The second session in the series, Five Ways to go Faster – the Long Game, will take place on Thursday 29 April. Click here to view the available sessions and register. 

Webinar: How to become a faster racer

Webinar: How to become a faster racer

As part of a new webinar series, InfoCrank is hosting a session aimed at helping riders become better racers by unlocking the full potential of their power meter.

Whether you’re training for your next time trial, want to ride Alpe d’Huez in a set time or if you’re chasing Zwift XP in Watopia, this webinar will help you to improve your performance on the bike.

Simple examples will demonstrate how to use your power meter to improve key parts of your riding and pedalling skills, which will benefit you both out on the roads and in eracing. The focus will be on the short game; getting faster quicker.

With practical, easy-to-do steps and skills you can take away to practice and perfect in your own time, the webinar will help you to unlock the full potential of your power meter. There’ll also be a Q&A at the end of the session.

To view the available times and sign up to the webinar, please click the link in the schedule below.

Webinar schedule:

Spaces on the webinars are limited. If you can’t make the session, please let us know as there is potential to add additional dates. Just get in touch via improve@vervecycling.com 

Projects 4

Image credit: Michael Blann.

20% discount for British Cycling staff

20% discount for British Cycling staff

20% Discount for British Cycling staff

British Cycling staff can access a 20% discount off the InfoCrank website and ride with the power meter used by Great Britain Cycling Team athletes. 

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InfoCrank is unique in its design and manufacture

The InfoCrank provides an unrivalled level of accuracy by calculating rider power from torque and cadence measurements made directly from within the crank arms.

With 256 torque and cadence measurements per second, the InfoCrank power data is always truly accurate. And it measures left and right legs independently to identify any physiological imbalances.

The InfoCrank provides true power data across all temperature conditions, with no data drift. And no data drift means no regular re-zeroing.

  • Certified water resistant to IPX7 standards
  • Temperature steady and designed to be tough in any conditions 
  • No regular re-zeroing required
  • Super-easy install and simple-to-use
  • The only power meter capable of validating online performances
  • Operates in 2 modes – Standard mode connects to the rider’s chosen head unit by Ant+ and High Speed Data mode connects to an on-board datalogger for in-depth pedal stroke analysis.
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British Cycling staff offer

To redeem the 20% discount, enter the coupon code BCstaff20 at checkout.

Terms and conditions:

This offer is subject to availability and is non-transferable. The discount cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer and cannot be applied retrospectively.  No cash alternative. Offer can be withdrawn at any time. 

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